Preservation Age

2 min. readlast update: 11.01.2023

Definition

Preservation Age, in the context of superannuation, refers to the minimum age at which you can access your superannuation benefits, provided you have met a condition of release, such as retirement. The preservation age varies depending on your date of birth.

Key Features

  1. Age Requirement: The preservation age ranges from 55 to 60 years old, depending on when you were born. For those born before 1 July 1960, the preservation age is 55. For those born on or after 1 July 1964, the preservation age is 60. For those born between these dates, the preservation age increases gradually.
  2. Condition of Release: Even once you reach your preservation age, you can only access your superannuation if you've also met a condition of release. The most common condition of release is retirement, but there are others, such as becoming permanently incapacitated or experiencing severe financial hardship.

Importance

Understanding your preservation age is crucial for retirement planning. It determines when you can start accessing your superannuation benefits and transition into retirement.

Considerations

While reaching your preservation age is a key milestone, it's not the only factor to consider when planning for retirement. You also need to consider your personal circumstances, financial needs, and the potential impact of accessing your superannuation early on your retirement savings.

Conclusion

Your Preservation Age is a critical factor in planning for retirement and understanding when you can access your superannuation benefits. It's important to know your preservation age and understand the conditions of release to make informed decisions about your retirement strategy. 

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